Understanding an Introvert; Part-II

A year back, I happened to write a post on introversion, and so far it has been my most read and shared blog post. In case you’re new to my blog, you can read it here. I thought about writing a part-II for it, mostly because I tend to harbor strong views on this tragically ignored crisis.

I always find a sense of solidarity with anyone who is reticent and quiet. Not because they’re missing out on fun or anything, but because I understand how hard it is to be silent in the constant hubbub and buzz around you. When the whole world is ‘trying to get their voice out there.’ Everyone trying to out-scream the other, making sure the spotlight is on them. Finding a guilty pleasure in being the life of the party.

People see you differently, don’t they? Somehow, you’re always branded by an adjective. Quiet, rude, arrogant, supercilious these are mere examples. I’m qualified to say all this because I go through all this every time I enter a new domain.

I sit back and have a habit of astutely observing people, hence forming a brief profile and calculating who’s the best candidate to talk with. Of course these profiles are not permanent, they improve or degrade as and when I decipher a human. Yes, decipher.

From what I’ve noted, most of the introverts are brilliant judges of character. Not because they are mystics or augurs, but because they listen more. If you tend to listen and notice, not just their gibberish but also their body language, you are already way past their locked doors, deep within their private domain which they prefer to keep hidden. And very soon you have a brief idea of their character without them knowing it. It’s more like a super-power.

Being an introvert, may sound vapid initially, but it’s the exact contrary. Like the ocean they appear all calm and composed on the surface, but inside their mind, their is a different world entirely.

There are wars going on in one corner, deductions and conclusions in the other, a story being dictated simultaneously in the background, questions and graphs calculating the complexities of the world, pictures of people they love stuck haphazardly on the wall, scribbled and re-written letters to someone unknown, a revolution of thoughts taking place against another set of thoughts, bundles of paper loaded with heavy thoughts they can never voice out, clusters of other people’s minds they found difficult to unravel, always formulating plans on how to observe things differently, confessions, observations, questions, love, heartbreak, family, their imaginary friends, and that voice! The one voice that always talks to them. Like their own version of Siri, it’s always counselling them. It is always helping them form an opinion, it is very confident in its decisions and somehow works as their alter ego. 

Remember, introverts are not shy, they are just not comfortable in taking the first step towards socializing. We do love our own company and would never hesitate in spending time alone. But understand, once you do manage to lower an introvert’s defenses, they will talk about almost everything and anything. From the most mundane to the most extravagant affair. You’ll be surprised at all the opinions they have over the smallest of things.

You’ll awe at the amount of activity going on in them. Like a whole universe trapped inside one mind. So much to listen and learn, like a riddle that gives you a sense of satisfaction once you start solving it.

It’ll be hard at first, but if you manage to understand their mind, you’ll be treading on an adventure. It won’t be easy of course, every adventure has its hitches, but I assure you, it’ll be worth it. You just have to be brave enough and set aside your ego, make them sit and allow them to talk. It’ll be slow and reluctant initially, but once they’re open, you better put your seat-belts on.

All it really takes is the right person to open the doors to an introvert’s mind.

And you thought being an Introvert was easy?

Revamp the Human in You

“Solitude is a crucial ingredient to creativity.”
-Susan Caine

It becomes somewhat difficult to be alone and by yourself when you’re constantly circled in a labyrinth of ‘News Feed’ , ‘Status Updates’ and ‘Photo Uploads.’ Yesterday, I accessed my Facebook account after 3 months approximately and it wasn’t even 24 hours when I had a severe headache and I felt a strange indignation within myself, so much that I closed it again.

Anyway, that is not what is important. The important thing is, the last 3 months have been the most productive 3 months of my life. After I quit Facebook, Instagram and all other social networks; I realized I had so much time in hand that I could channelize in so many good things instead of wasting it rummaging through these futile updates.

People are so obsessed in trying to create a ‘virtual’ image of themselves that they are forgetting that what they portray on the internet is nothing but an ‘IMAGE’ of you. It’s a banner you carry with you, so you try to festoon it with all the gleam possible to make your public profile LOOK better.

This has occurred on such a traumatic level that people are becoming completely oblivious to themselves. They are forgetting to improve their own self on a human and spiritual level. As my friend Steve rightly said, “When I go to college, I want to have some years to myself,” and I thought it was very admirable of him to infer that thought (now don’t get too cocky Steve.) 😛

I’ll give you a list of things I achieved during the past ‘Non-Social Network’ 3 months.

1.) Started working as a Freelance Writer.

2.) Read a gazillion books.

3.) Wrote the first chapter to my book which is not very ‘edgy’ but it’s something.

4.) Decorated my bedroom wall with all sorts of posters and art and craft.

5.) Gave my exams peacefully.

6.) Noticed that when I left social networks my mind caught some brilliant thoughts and ideas to write about.

7.) I blogged more and wrote more.

8.) And lastly, and what I believe is the best, I became more thoughtful. More than I already was. I believe Insight and Wisdom are a gift and these two things can be improved by experience and listening. Talk less;Listen more.

What happens when you spend time with yourself?

You become more aware of the importance of your presence in this world. You realize your full potential and you understand that you deserve more and that you can achieve more by working hard. You come to know that everything on this Earth has a reason affixed to it. The great classics that have been written in the history have all been scripted by writers who spent time alone.

Seclusion, if harnessed the right way can open doors to a plethora of imagination, curiosity, insight and wisdom. It leads to long hours of reflecting over things and the environment around you.  J.K Rowling, Emma Watson, Bill Gates are just a few names in the long list of successful people who spent time with themselves. Because when you’re alone, you think, you ponder and you brood. It hones your mind and your brain. It shapes your thoughts prunes your imagination.

Read carefully,

You don’t have to bereft yourself from the happenings of the world, you just have to direct your time and attention to things more imperative in life. Things that matter more.